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Ceremony
Breakup albums mark a turning point for a band: the moment when their sound completely changes and reaches a new level of emotional clarity. All that heartbreak and malaise condensed into any single record often makes for a defining piece of work, no matter the genre. The best records explore the nooks and crannies of sadness, learning it inside and out — celebrating it.

Ceremony’s fifth studio album, The L-Shaped Man, uses singer Ross Farrar’s recent breakup as a platform to explore loneliness and emotional weariness, but it is by no means a purely sad album. Rather than look inward, Farrar uses his experience to write about what it means to go through something heavy and come out the other side a different person.

In order to tell Farrar's story, Ceremony have almost completely stripped back the propulsive hardcore of their previous records, turning every angry outburst into simmering despair. “We’ve always tried to be minimalists in writing, even if it’s loud or fast or abrasive,” says lead guitarist Anthony Anzaldo. “It’s really intense when I hear it. Not in a way where you turn everything up to ten. Things are so bare, you’re holding this one note for so long and you don’t now where it’s going—to me, that’s intensity.” That intensity is apparent on “Exit Fears,” the first full song on the record. It meticulously pairs Justin Davis’ loping bassline, which pulls the track along, with Anzaldo's icy, minimal guitar work. It brings to mind some alternate version of Joy Division that hasn’t quite lost all hope. It gets close to exploding, but instead plays the shadows, never quite rising above a nervous simmer.

“A lot of the content has to do with loss, and specifically the loss of someone who you care deeply about,” Farrar says. “There is no way for you to go through something like this artistically and not have really strong emotions of loss and pain. There’s not really any way to hide that.” Farrar, for his part, is singing with a new kind of intensity, his baritone swooping and retreating from stressed angst to unsettling near-mutter as he sings, “You told your friends you were fine/ you thought you were fine too…” and later, “nothing is ever fine/ nothing ever feels right/ you have to tell yourself you tried.” It’s the first of many lyrically direct moments, and it should be hard to listen to, but Ceremony have so effortlessly nailed the sound of sadness that it feels great to live inside for awhile.

The sound is abetted by producer John Reis, who honed his sound in seminal bands like Rocket from the Crypt, Drive Like Jehu, and Hot Snakes. Much of the gravelly aggression he experimented with in those bands is present on The L-Shaped Man.

There's a story behind the title too. “I was speaking to our driver Stephen while on tour,” Farrar says. “We were talking about men in general and what shape they are…their body type. I said, ‘I guess men are in the shape of an L. The torso is straight. Vertical. And then you have the little feet at the end.’ There’s this painter named Leslie Lerner who was living in San Francisco in the ‘70s and ‘80s and made these beautiful paintings. He died on my 21st birthday. A lot of the record is about the similarities in our ideas. In what we’re trying to make. Things that have to do with love and losing love.”

Ceremony
Breakup albums mark a turning point for a band: the moment when their sound completely changes and reaches a new level of emotional clarity. All that heartbreak and malaise condensed into any single... + more bio

Tour Dates
Date Location Venue
05/22/15 Fri Berkeley, CA 924 Gilman St with Negative Approach
05/23/15 Sat Los Angeles, CA Echoplex with Negative Approach
06/12/15 Fri Visalia, CA Cellar Door with Tony Molina, Creative Adult
06/13/15 Sat San Diego, CA Strong Hold with Tony Molina, Uniform
06/14/15 Sun Phoenix, AZ The Rebel Lounge with Tony Molina, Uniform
06/15/15 Mon Tucson, AZ Club Congress with Tony Molina, Uniform
06/16/15 Tue El Paso, TX Tricky Falls with Tony Molina, Uniform
06/17/15 Wed Austin, TX Red 7 with Tony Molina, Radioactivity, Uniform
06/18/15 Thu Dallas, TX Sons of Hermann Hall with Tony Molina, Radioactivity, Uniform
06/19/15 Fri Houston, TX Walters Downtown with Tony Molina, Uniform
06/20/15 Sat New Orleans, LA One Eyed Jacks with Tony Molina
06/21/15 Sun Gainesville, FL The Atlantic Nightspot with Tony Molina
06/22/15 Mon Tampa, FL Epic Problem (formerly Transitions Art Gallery) with Tony Molina
06/23/15 Tue Orlando, FL The Social with Tony Molina
06/24/15 Wed Atlanta, GA Drunken Unicorn with Tony Molina
06/25/15 Thu Raleigh, NC Kings with Tony Molina
06/26/15 Fri Washington, DC Rock & Roll Hotel with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
06/27/15 Sat Philadelphia, PA Union Transfer with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
06/28/15 Sun Somerville, MA Cuisine en Locale with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
07/01/15 Wed New York, NY The Bowery Ballroom with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
07/05/15 Sun Buffalo, NY Mohawk Place with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
07/06/15 Mon Cleveland, OH Now That's Class Lounge with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
07/07/15 Tue Detroit, MI Marble with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
07/08/15 Wed Chicago, IL Lincoln Hall with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
07/09/15 Thu Madison, WI The Frequency with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
07/10/15 Fri Minneapolis, MN 7th Street Entry with Pity Sex, Tony Molina
07/11/15 Sat Omaha, NE Sweatshop Gallery with Tony Molina, Creative Adult
07/12/15 Sun Denver, CO Moon Room with Tony Molina, Creative Adult
07/13/15 Mon Salt Lake City, UT Kilby Court with Tony Molina, Creative Adult
07/14/15 Tue Boise, ID The Shredder with Tony Molina, Creative Adult
07/15/15 Wed Seattle, WA Neumo's with Tony Molina, Creative Adult
07/16/15 Thu Portland, OR Analog Cafe with Tony Molina, Creative Adult
Avails
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Contacts
Responsible Agent:
Mahmood Shaikh
Radio:
Hector Montes
Beggars Group
Management:
Rennie Jaffe